Trillium Brewing Company: Amarillo Dry Hopped Sunshower Super Saison

Trillium Brewing Company: Amarillo Dry-Hopped Sunshower Super Saison

Style: Imperial Stout

Special Notes: Brewed with coffee from Barrington Coffee

Hops: Amarillo, Columbus

Malts: Pilsner, White Wheat, Flaked Wheat

ABV: 8.5%

IBU: N/A

Availability: Rotating

@untappd says: 4.02/5

Dug to the back of the fridge and pulled out a flower!

For real, this is the last can of Trillium Brewing Company beer left over from my trip in September. Anyway, before we get into the Amarillo Dry Hopped Sunshower Super Saison, let’s talk about gravity!

No, I don’t mean the kind of gravity that caused Newton to get conked on the head by an apple back in the 17th century. I’m talking about gravity when it comes to brewing. According to Craftbeer.com, “A gravity reading refers to the total amount of dissolved solids in water. Since we’re talking about beer, those dissolved solids are sugars.” Basically, yeast needs to eat. Wort with higher original gravity (OG), or more sugar, means the yeast eats more, and produces more alcohol and other good things. So, the higher the gravity of a brew, the higher the sugar in it, which usually means a higher ABV. It can also mean a deeper, more intense flavor.

Trillium Brewing Company: Amarillo Dry-Hopped Sunshower Super Saison label
Love that flowery label. Can you see the rain? (Credit: Martin Stezano/Beers on Windowsills)

OK, now that class is over, let’s get to the Sunshower! It’s a high-gravity farmhouse ale which, according to Trillium, is inspired by the “ethereal refreshing mid-summer moments when we experience both rainfall and the heat of the sun in New England.” If you’re from New England, you know exactly what that means, and there’s no better way to describe it. The higher ABV (caused by the higher gravity, if you recall our lesson), makes an otherwise light and effervescent brew pretty punchy, which is a nice change of pace.

Although my leftover Sunshower can wasn’t exactly straight from the cannery—I had the rest of the ones I bought right after I bought them—the beer within was still pretty nice and quite tasty. The dry hopping with Amarillo definitely brought a little more complexity to the flavors, too. Really enjoyable. Need to review a fresh one next time!

Have you checked out Beers on Windowsills on Instagram yet? Get over there for more great craft beer!

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. Trillium Brewing Company: Amarillo Dry Hopped Sunshower Super Saison . Dug to the back of the fridge and pulled out a flower! . For real, this is the last can of Trillium left over from my trip in September. Anyway, before we get into the Amarillo Dry Hopped Sunshower Super Saison from Trillium Brewing Company, let’s talk about gravity! . No, I don’t mean the kind of gravity that caused Newton to get conked on the head by an apple back in the 17th century. I’m talking about gravity when it comes to brewing. According to @craftbeerdotcom, “A gravity reading refers to the total amount of dissolved solids in water. Since we’re talking about beer, those dissolved solids are sugars.” Basically, yeast needs to eat. Wort with higher original gravity (OG), or more sugar, means the yeast eats more, and produces more alcohol and other good things. So, the higher the gravity of a brew, the higher the sugar in it, which usually means a higher ABV. It can also mean a deeper, more intense flavor. . OK, now that class is over, let’s get to the Sunshower! It’s a high-gravity farmhouse ale which, according to Trillium, is inspired by the “ethereal refreshing mid-summer moments when we experience both rainfall and the heat of the sun in New England.” If you’re from New England, you know exactly what that means, and there’s no better way to describe it. The higher ABV (caused by the higher gravity, if you recall our lesson), makes an otherwise light and effervescent brew pretty punchy, which is a nice change of pace. . Although my leftover Sunshower can wasn’t exactly straight from the cannery—I had the rest of the ones I bought right after I bought them—the beer within was still pretty nice and quite tasty. The dry hopping with Amarillo definitely brought a little more complexity to the flavors, too. Really enjoyable. Need to review a fresh one next time! . ABV: 8.5%, ABV: N/A, Rotating availability . @untappd says: 4.02/5

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Dogfish Head Craft Brewery: Fruit-Full Fort (2018)

Dogfish Head Craft Brewery: Fruit-Full Fort

Style: Belgian-style fruit ale

Special Notes: Brewed with raspberries, blueberries, boysenberries and elderberries.

ABV: 17.2%

IBU: 50

Availability: Limited

@untappd says: 3.91/5

We’re building another fort on the Windowsill today!

Last February, we had an ass-kicking raspberry ale from Dogfish Head Craft Brewery on the Windowsill. It was called Fort, and I can honestly say that it’s still the strongest fruit beer I’ve ever had. Today’s beer is Dogfish Head’s follow up to that brew, the Fruit-Full Fort.

Dogfish Head Craft Brewery: Fruit-Full Fort
Definitely more than a handful of berries in this brew! (Credit: Martin Stezano/Beers on Windowsills)

Rather than just raspberries this time, owner Sam Calagione has opted instead to open up his berry sensibilities by including a “boatload” of raspberries, blueberries, boysenberries and elderberries in this version of the Fort. The result is more of the same oomph that the Fort brought to the table. Boozy and fruity—almost like a glass of sweet wine. Be careful with this one, but enjoy the fruity goodness!

Did you notice the yellow bottle cap on the Fruit-Full Fort? Most Dogfish Head heads know what it means—that you’re about to get knocked on your ass by just a few sips, since all yellow-capped beers from Dogfish Head are over 15% in ABV. However, like everything else about this Delaware-based brewery, there’s a story behind it.

Dogfish Head Craft Brewery's yellow danger cap
You better watch out when you see one of these babies! (Credit: Martin Stezano/Beers on Windowsills)

Back in the 1990s, when Dogfish’s World Wide Stout first came out, it had a very similar label and cap color to a different, much less expensive beer, the Indian Brown Ale. Sticky-fingered, stingy beer drinkers would often conceal World Wide bottles in their Indian Brown six-packs to sneak them past unaware liquor store clerks. The company took enough losses on the World Wide that it started using these yellow “Yield” caps to put an end to the thievery. Eventually, they started putting the “danger cap” on all of their hefty beers, as a warning to consumers that booze is on the way, and they might want to put on a helmet before sipping. For me, these aren’t a warning, though; they’re a challenge!

How many danger caps have you had, Windowsillers?

Head over to Instagram now to check out more great craft beer. Be sure to like this post and follow @beersonwindowsills!

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. Dogfish Head Craft Brewery: Fruit-Full Fort (2018) . We’re building another fort on the Windowsill today! . Last February, we had an ass-kicking raspberry ale from Dogfish Head on the Windowsill. It was called Fort, and I can honestly say that it’s still the strongest fruit beer I’ve ever had. Today’s beer is Dogfish Head’s follow up to that brew, the Fruit-Full Fort. . Rather than just raspberries this time, owner Sam Calagione has opted instead to open up his berry sensibilities by including a “boatload” of raspberries, blueberries, boysenberries and elderberries in this version of the Fort. The result is more of the same oomph that the Fort brought to the table. Boozy and fruity—almost like a glass of sweet wine. Be careful with this one, but enjoy the fruity goodness! . Did you notice the yellow bottle cap on the Fruit-Full Fort? Most Dogfish Head heads know what it means—that you’re about to get knocked on your ass by just a few sips, since all yellow-capped beers from Dogfish Head are over 15% in ABV. However, like everything else about this Delaware-based brewery, there’s a story behind it. . Back in the 1990s, when Dogfish’s World Wide Stout first came out, it had a very similar label and cap color to a different, much less expensive beer, the Indian Brown Ale. Sticky-fingered, stingy beer drinkers would often conceal World Wide bottles in their Indian Brown sixpacks to sneak them past unaware liquor store clerks. The company took enough losses on the World Wide that it started using these yellow “Yield” caps to put an end to the thievery. Eventually, they started putting the “danger cap” on all of their hefty beers, as a warning to consumers that booze is on the way, and they might want to put on a helmet before sipping. For me, these aren’t a warning, though; they’re a challenge! . How many danger caps have you had, Windowsillers? . ABV: 17.2%, IBU: 50, part of Dogfish Head’s “Rarities” releases . @untappd says: 3.91

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Two Roads Brewing Company: Two Evil: Saigon Scooter Selfie

Two Roads Brewing Company: Two Evil: Saigon Scooter Selfie

Style: Vietnamese-style Coffee Stout

Special Notes: Brewed with coffee, brown sugar and cream extract—in the style of Ca Phe Sua Da (Vietnamese iced coffee). Collaboration with Evil Twin Brewing and Heart of Darkness Brewery Saigon.

ABV: 9.5%

IBU: N/A

Availability: Limited

@untappd says: 4.05/5

Taking the Windowsill to Saigon today!

Have you ever heard of Ca Phe Sua Da? I hadn’t either. As it turns out, it’s a style of coffee that originated in Vietnam. According to Steamy Kitchen, “Vietnamese Iced Coffee is an intensely brewed coffee concentrate that drips down into a tall glass of ice and a big spoonful of sweetened condensed milk.” The result is a rich, creamy, smooth, sweet and intense coffee flavor that can be a bit shocking to those of us used to “regular” coffee.

Two Roads Brewing Company: Two Evil: Saigon Scooter Selfie
Sometimes a happy accident can lead to great inspiration. Like this label! (Credit: Martin Stezano/Beers on Windowsills)

Sounds good, right? Well, that’s what the Saigon Scooter Selfie is; a Vietnamese style coffee stout. It’s brewed with coffee, as well as brown sugar and cream extract. The beer is the latest—along with the Geyser Gose and the Pachamama Porter—in the Two Evil series of collaborations between Two Roads Brewing Company and Evil Twin Brewing. For this Vietnamese-inspired stout, brewers Phil Markowski (Two Roads) and Jeppe Jarnit-Bjergsø (Evil Twin) actually traveled to Saigon—they’ve traveled somewhere to brew all of the Two Evil beers—to work with Duane Morton, head brewer at Heart of Darkness Brewery.

The label is inspired by a real photo taken by co-founder of Two Roads Clem Pellani. Pellani was actually trying to take a video, but ended up taking selfie instead… on a scooter… in Saigon.

Much like the Vietnamese-style coffee, the end product of this collaboration was rich, creamy, decadent stout. The label describes it like a coffee milkshake, and that’s really what it is. I haven’t had another stout quite like it, and I really wish I had another. It also makes me desperately want to try the real Ca Phe Sua Da… so I think that’s what I’ll be doing next!

Head over to Instagram to check this one out, now!

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. Two Roads Brewing Company: Two Evil: Saigon Scooter Selfie . Taking the Windowsill to Saigon today! . Have you ever heard of Ca Phe Sua Da? I hadn’t either. As it turns out, it’s a style of coffee that originated in Vietnam. According to @steamykitchen, “Vietnamese Iced Coffee is an intensely brewed coffee concentrate that drips down into a tall glass of ice and a big spoonful of sweetened condensed milk.” The result is a rich, creamy, smooth, sweet and intense coffee flavor that can be a bit shocking to those of us used to “regular” coffee. . Sounds good, right? Well, that’s what the Saigon Scooter Selfie is; a Vietnamese style coffee stout. It’s brewed with coffee, as well as brown sugar and cream extract. The beer is the latest—along with the Geyser Gose and the Pachamama—in the Two Evil series of collaborations between @tworoadsbrewing and @eviltwinbrewing. For this Vietnamese-inspired stout, brewers Phil Markowski (Two Roads) and Jeppe Jarnit-Bjergsø (Evil Twin) actually traveled to Saigon—they’ve travel somewhere to brew all of the Two Evil beers—to work with Duane Morton, head brewer at @heartofdarknessbrewery. The label is inspired by a real photo taken by co-founder of Two Roads Clem Pellani. Pellani was actually trying to take a video, but ended up taking selfie instead… on a scooter… in Saigon. . Much like the Vietnamese-style coffee, the end product of this collaboration was rich, creamy, decadent stout. The label describes it like a coffee milkshake, and that’s really what it is. I haven’t had another stout quite like it, and I really wish I had another. It also makes me desperately want to try the real Ca Phe Sua Da… so I think that’s what I’ll be doing next! . ABV: 9.5%, IBU: N/A, Limited availability . @untappd says: 4.05/5

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BAD SONS Beer Company: Big Whoop

BAD SONS Beer Co.: Big Whoop

Style: New England-style Double IPA

ABV: 9.0%

IBU: N/A

Availability: Rotating

@untappd says: 3.89/5

Beers on Windowsills Returns to BAD SONS!

We’ll keep it brief for you Friday Instagrammers, but I wanted to give a quick shout out to BAD SONS Beer Co. with this photo that somehow got lost in my archives. Their top notch taproom is located in Derby, CT, and has only been around since the summer of 2017. Despite its short time in business, the brewery has always impressed me with the quality of the brews it puts out. If you’re looking for solid beer in CT, you can’t go wrong with BAD SONS!

Unfortunately, I don’t have too much information about the Big Whoop. It’s a pretty hefty double IPA that, at 9.0% ABV, packs quite a punch. That being said, it’s still very juicy and smooth, which makes it a little dangerous. I didn’t know it was so potent until I stood up after I drank it!

Big Whoop

BIG WHOOP comin' in hot to the taproom this Friday 3/16! Limited Can Release starting at noon. Can I get a Whoop Whoop!?! #DIPA #newbeer #canrelease #ctcraftbeer

Posted by BAD SONS Beer Co. on Thursday, March 15, 2018

I’ll actually be in the taproom with my good buddy, Brian and our wives this Saturday… Maybe I’ll see you there? Maybe I’ll have a Big Whoop?

Check us out on Instagram for great craft beer from Connecticut, and all over the country!

Beer’d Brewing Company: You Like ‘A Da Juice

Beer'd Brewing Company: You Like 'A Da Juice

Style: New England-style IPA

Special Notes: Originally brewed as part of the brewery’s experimental Next Episode series.

Hops: Mosaic, Galaxy, Citra, Ekuanot Powder, Mosaic Powder

ABV: 7.2%

IBU: 77

Availability: Rotating

@untappd says: 4.16/5

We have a new brewery on the Windowsill today!

Ever since I first heard about Beer’d Brewing Company, I’ve been itching to get them on my sill. I liked everything I read about them, from the quality of their beer to the kickass logo and can designs. When I found out that the Stonington, CT-based brewery had expanded its distribution, and was now showing up on the shelves of one of my local liquor stores, I got my wallet and jumped in my car.

Beer'd Brewing Company: You Like 'A Da Juice
You like ‘a dis label? Yeah… you like ‘a dis labe! (Credit: Martin Stezano/Beers on Windowsills)

Before I get to the You Like ‘A Da Juice, let me tell you a bit about the brewery. Beer’d opened its taps in 2012, making it a relative old bearded man in the Connecticut craft game. The brewery was opened by beer-loving power couple Aaren and Precious Simoncini, and still uses a humble 7BBL system to make their delicious drinks. I love their philosophy on beer, too. Their site says:

“Our aim is to reincarnate the days gone by when beer was produced by someone on your block rather than a multinational corporation. We are obviously not concerned with economies of scale and we think that shows in the quality of our offerings!”

That sounds pretty awesome to me. That’s why I’m hoping to visit next month!

OK. Now for the brew, which is why we’re all here! The You Like ‘A Da Juice is a double dry-hopped IPA that started as an experimental batch—Episode 8 in Beer’d’s Next Episode Series. People Like ‘A-ed it so much, that now it’s a permanent part of the lineup. I certainly Like ‘A da hop bill. It’s made up of Eukanot, Mosaic, Galaxy and Citra—both in pellet and lupulin powder form during the double dry hopping. I Like ‘A Dis Juicy Beer!

Check this one out on Instagram now. Like and follow us for more great craft beer!

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. Beer’d Brewing Company: You Like ‘A Da Juice . We have a new brewery on the Windowsill today! . Ever since I first heard about Beer'd Brewing Company, I’ve been itching to get them on my sill. I liked everything I read about them, from the quality of their beer to the kickass logo and can designs. When I found out that the Stonington, CT-based brewery had expanded its distribution, and was now showing up on the shelves of one of my local liquor stores, I got my wallet and jumped in my car. . Before I get to the You Like ‘A Da Juice, let me tell you a bit about the brewery. Beer’d opened its taps in 2012, making it a relative old bearded man in the Connecticut craft game. The brewery was opened by beer-loving power couple Aaren and Precious Simoncini, and still uses a humble 7BBL system to make their delicious drinks. I love their philosophy on beer, too. Their site says: . "Our aim is to reincarnate the days gone by when beer was produced by someone on your block rather than a multinational corporation. We are obviously not concerned with economies of scale and we think that shows in the quality of our offerings!" . That sounds pretty awesome to me. That's why I’m hoping to visit next month! . OK. Now for the brew, which is why we’re all here! The You Like ‘A Da Juice is a double dry-hopped IPA that started as an experimental batch—Episode 8 in Beer’d’s Next Episode Series. People Like ‘A-ed it so much, that now it’s a permanent part of the lineup. I certainly Like ‘A da hop bill. It’s made up of Eukanot, Mosaic, Galaxy and Citra—both in pellet and lupulin powder form during the double dry hopping. I Like ‘A Dis Juicy Beer! . ABV: 7.0%, IBU: 40, Rotating availability . @untappd says: 4.08/5

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Clown Shoes: Don’t Fear the Blender

Clown Shoes: Don't Fear the Blender

Style: Tropical Fruit Smoothie IPA

Special Notes: Brewed with guava, mango, pineapple puree and lactose sugar

ABV: 7.0%

IBU: N/A

Availability: Rotating

@untappd says: 3.87/5

My Milkshake has brought you all to the Windowsill today! Damn right!

So what’s a Milkshake IPA, anyway? According to Denver Westword, it’s an IPA made with milk sugar and lactose, which gives it a creamy, milkshake-like mouthfeel and appearance. The style also typically includes “the kinds of sweet treats you would find in a Milkshake: strawberries, peaches, chocolate, vanilla, mangoes and the like.” Most milkshakes are also spinoffs on New England-style IPAs, because they’re inherently tropical and low on bitterness. The exact inventor of the style is hard to nail down, but Westword says that Milkshake IPA, a 2015 collaboration between Tired Hands Brewing Company and Omnipollo, is often credited as the first.

Clown Shoes: Don't Fear the Blender
The reaper’s having a beer with us! (Credit: Martin Stezano/Beers on Windowsills)

Cut to four years later, and milkshakes have been popping up all over the place, and in great abundance. The one on my Windowsill comes from Massachusetts’ Clown Shoes. They bill it as a Tropical Fruit Smoothie IPA, but a milkshake by any other name, is still a milkshake. This one is made with guava, mango and pineapple puree. Solid fruity flavors and good mouthfeel to boot. I enjoyed it very much!

In case you’re wondering about that badass label art, it’s designed by Michael Axt and depicts the following, according to Clown Shoes: “The Grim Reaper has grown weary of being Death. Here we find him festive, semi-retired, and at the beginning of a craft beer journey.” We’ve all been there, Grimmy. Welcome to the craft beer community!

Make sure you like this one on Instagram, and follow Beers on Windowsills for more great craft beer!

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. Clown Shoes: Don’t Fear the Blender . My Milkshake has brought you all to the Windowsill today! Damn right! . So what’s a Milkshake IPA, anyway? According to @denverwestword, it’s an IPA made with milk sugar and lactose, which gives it a creamy, milkshake-like mouthfeel and appearance. The style also typically includes “the kinds of sweet treats you would find in a Milkshake: strawberries, peaches, chocolate, vanilla, mangoes and the like.” Most milkshakes are also spinoffs on New England-style IPAs, because they’re inherently tropical and low on bitterness. The exact inventor of the style is hard to nail down, but Westword says that Milkshake IPA, a 2015 collaboration between @tiredhandsbrewing and @omnipollo, is often credited as the first. . Cut to four years later, and milkshakes have been popping up all over the place, and in great abundance. The one on my Windowsill comes from Massachusetts’ Clown Shoes. They bill it as a Tropical Fruit Smoothie IPA, but a milkshake by any other name, is still a milkshake. This one is made with guava, mango and pineapple puree. Solid fruity flavors and good mouthfeel to boot. I enjoyed it very much! . In case you’re wondering about that badass label art, it’s designed by @axtimusprime and depicts the following, according to @clownshoesbeer: “The Grim Reaper has grown weary of being Death. Here we find him festive, semi-retired, and at the beginning of a craft beer journey.” We’ve all been there, Grimmy. Welcome to the craft beer community! . ABV: 7.0%, IBU: N/A, Rotating availability . @untappd says: 3.86/5

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Trillium Brewing Company: PM Dawn

Trillium Brewing Company: PM Dawn

Style: Imperial Stout

Special Notes: Brewed with coffee from Barrington Coffee

ABV: 9.0%

IBU: N/A

Availability: Rotating

@untappd says: 4.30/5

Stout Season is still going strong on the Windowsill today!

This is another Trillium Brewing Company brew from my trip in September, the PM Dawn. It’s one of many beers—of all styles—that the Boston-based brewery has made in collaboration with their Fort Point neighbors, Barrington Coffee Roasting. You might have tried some of the others, like the Night & Day, the Day & Night, the Coffee Cake and the Affogato.

Trillium Brewing Company: PM Dawn
Why show one, when I can show two? (Credit: Martin Stezano/Beers on Windowsills)

This is the first Stout I’ve ever tried from Trillium, and I can absolutely guarantee you I’m going to be looking for more of them when I go to their Canton location in February. It’s brewed with cold brewed coffee, which, in my opinion, is way better than regular coffee brewed hot. Why? First of all, it contains more caffeine than regular coffee. It’s also easier on your stomach, as the heat used in brewing a regular cup of Joe can add to the drink’s acidity.

Enough about the Java though. The PM Dawn is divine. The nose hits you with some solid earthy, roasted coffee and chocolate. The flavor follows suit with more chocolate, vanilla and rich and creamy coffeeness. One thing I like in my stouts is a heavier mouthfeel and, although it’s not quite motor oil, the PM Dawn is fairly heavy and thick. Very balanced, and just plain awesome.

Head over to my Instagram page to celebrate Stout Season with amazing craft beer!

SingleCut Beersmiths: Mo’ Shuggie Double Dry-Hop IPA

SingleCut Beersmiths: Mo' Shuggie Double Dry-Hop IPA

Style: Double Dry-Hopped IPA

Special Notes: The latest iteration on the SingleCut series inspired by cult guitar legend Shuggie Otis.

ABV: 7.2%

IBU: 77

Availability: Rotating

@untappd says: 4.16/5

Why settle for less, when you can have mo’?

Once again, we have a delicious IPA from SingleCut Beersmiths on the Windowsill today. The Mo’ Shuggie Double Dry-Hop IPA! This one comes courtesy of my neighbor Jesse. He told me this was his favorite beer from SingleCut, and that I had to try it. Let me tell you, I was not disappointed!

As usual, the Mo’ Shuggie gets its name because of SingleCut owner Rich Buceta’s undying love for obscure classic rock lyrics and artists. That’s not meant as any disrespect towards Johnny Alexander Veliotes, Jr. aka “Shuggie” Otis. But I, like many casual music fans I’m sure, had never heard of Otis before I started researching this beer. So who is he? Only one of the best guitarists of his day, of course. He’s a cult legend who was once asked to join the Rolling Stones on tour, and was approached by Quincy Jones to produce an album. He turned both down!

SingleCut Beersmiths: Mo' Shuggie Double Dry-Hop IPA

I’ll let you guys do your own research on this guy, but check out his song “Strawberry Letter 23.” Although Shuggie didn’t make this a hit, it became a hit when the Brothers Johnson covered it in 1977, and it has been sampled to high heaven in the decades since. Watch the video below!

None of this matters if the beer’s no good, right? SingleCut originally released a beer called the Shuggie Mini Soulbender IPA. It was a session IPA named after Otis, and a type of guitar pedal used by musicians like him for sound distortion. Several months later, they released the Mo’ Shuggie Soulbender IPA—a bigger version of the beer. Finally, in 2018, they double dry-hopped the crap out of the beer. Even Mo’ hops. Even Mo’ malts. Even Mo’ Mo’ Shuggie.

The result is a beer that’s deliciously hazy and hoppy. Great aroma, wonderful flavor. Great usage of those New Zealand hops! Just plain awesome. Go get some!

As always, you can like this one on Instagram, and follow us for more great craft beer!

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. SingleCut Beersmiths: Mo’ Shuggie Double Dry-Hop IPA . Why settle for less, when you can have mo’? . Once again, we have a delicious IPA from @singlecutbeer on the Windowsill today. The Double Dry-Hopped Mo’ Shuggie! This one comes courtesy of one of my neighbors, @jessedaignault. He told me this was his favorite beer from SingleCut, and that I had to try it. Let me tell you, I was not disappointed! . As usual, the Mo’ Shuggie gets its name because of SingleCut owner Rich Buceta’s undying love for obscure classic rock lyrics and artists. That’s not meant as any disrespect towards Johnny Alexander Veliotes, Jr. aka “Shuggie” Otis. But I, like many casual music fans I’m sure, had never heard of Otis before I started researching this beer. So who is he? One of the best guitarists of his day, of course. He’s a cult legend who was once asked to join the Rolling Stones on tour, and was approached by Quincy Jones to produce an album. He turned both down! . I’ll let you guys do your own research on this guy, but check out his song “Strawberry Letter 23.” Although Shuggie didn’t make this a hit, it became a hit when the Brothers Johnson covered it in 1977, and it has been sampled to high heaven in the decades since. . None of this matters if the beer’s no good, right? SingleCut originally released a beer called the Shuggie Mini Soulbender IPA. It was a session IPA named after Otis, and a type of guitar pedal used by musicians like him for sound distortion. Several months later, they released the Mo’ Shuggie Soulbender—a bigger version of the beer. Finally, in 2018, they double dry-hopped the crap out of the beer. Even Mo’ hops. Even Mo’ malts. Even Mo’ Mo’ Shuggie. . The result is a beer that's deliciously hazy and hoppy. Great aroma, wonderful flavor. Great usage of those New Zealand hops! Just plain awesome. Go get some! . ABV: 7.2%, IBU: 77, Rotating availability . @untappd says: 4.16/5

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Trillium Brewing Company: Permutation Series: Number Fourteen

Trillium Brewing Company: Permutation Number Fourteen

Style: American Wild Ale

Special Notes: Brewed with locally sourced apple juice

Hops: US Goldings

Malt: Pilsner, Valley Wheat, Valley Triticale, Maine Grains Flaked Triticale, Maine Grains Flaked Rye

ABV: 6.3%

IBU: N/A

Availability: Limited

@untappd says: 3.99/5

You guys liked the DDH Stillings Street so much, that I dug up another Trillium Brewing Company brew from my lost photos archive for you: The Permutation Series: Number Fourteen!

Trillium Brewing Company: Permutation Number Fourteen
There’s nothing quite like a big ol’ bottle of delicious Trillium beer. (Credit: Martin Stezano/Beers on Windowsills)

Have you heard of Trillium’s Permutation Series? Well, any good brewery worth its salt makes sure to do a lot of experimentation. You mess with recipes, ingredients, boil times and styles. If something sticks, or turns out really well, you give it to the people. Trillium describes their Permutation series like this: “Permutation is our experimental series of small batch offerings, showcasing the unique visions and innovative concepts developed by our brewing and cellar crew.” Thus far, there have been over 70 of these limited brews.

The Fourteen is an American Wild Ale brewed with apple juice from Lookout Farm in Natick, MA. It’s brewed with several types of malts and grains—Valley Wheat, Valley Triticale, Maine Grains Flaked Triticale, and Maine Grains Flaked Rye—and US Goldings hops. Flavors of apple and white wine really shine through on this funky, sour, wild brew. A solid experiment, for sure!

Check out my Instagram for more great Trillium brews!

The Alchemist: Luscious (2018)

The Alchemist: Luscious

Style: British Imperial Stout

Special Notes: Made with 50% specialty malt for more flavor.

ABV: 9.2%

IBU: N/A

Availability: Rotating

@untappd says: 4.27/5

We have a nice bit of deep, dark lusciousness on the Windowsill today!

Can you imagine a world without beer from Vermont’s The Alchemist? Well, back in 2011, their brewpub in Waterbury—this was long before the beautiful new facility in Stowe—was completely devastated by a flood. According to the Waterbury Record, the floodwaters “destroyed nearly everything in the Alchemist basement. A walk-in cooler, compressors, computers, the malt, beer, food, recipes—all were damaged beyond repair.”

Facing basically being out of business, owner John Kimmich was able to save two beers. Heady Topper and Luscious. Four days after the flood, Kimmich opened a temporary cannery. The Luscious and the Heady Topper helped save the company when it was released for 11/11/11. You can imagine why this beer holds a special place in Kimmich’s heart.

The Alchemist: Luscious
Like the label says, this one was truly luscious.(Credit: Martin Stezano/Beers on Windowsills)

Well, now it holds a special place in my heart, too. I picked up this can all the way back in June, when I visited for @itsmeitsbmd1085’s bachelor party. This was my last can leftover from that trip. As bittersweet as that is, this beer definitely had no bitterness to it at all. Just luscious, sweet deliciousness. It’s a British-style imperial stout with a good kick and some great flavor to boot. One interesting note about this version that separates it from the ones brewed before 2017 is that Alchemist now works on a five-week-brewing cycle. Previous versions of the Luscious was often aged for 8, or even 12, weeks.

The ones you’re getting at their Stowe location these days are much younger. You can have them fresh, or age them a while. Mine spent almost seven months in the fridge, and it was still incredible!

Check this one out on Instagram, now! Be sure to like and follow Beers on Windowsills!

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. The Alchemist: Luscious (2018) . We have a nice bit of deep, dark lusciousness on the Windowsill today! . Can you imagine a world without beer from Vermont’s The Alchemist? Well, back in 2011, their brewpub in Waterbury—this was long before the beautiful new facility in Stowe—was completely devastated by a flood. According to @beerconnoisseurmag, the floodwaters “destroyed nearly everything in the Alchemist basement. A walk-in cooler, compressors, computers, the malt, beer, food, recipes—all were damaged beyond repair.” . Facing basically being out of business, owner John Kimmich was able to save two beers. Heady Topper and Luscious. Four days after the flood, Kimmich opened a temporary cannery. The Luscious and the Heady Topper helped save the company when it was released for 11/11/11. You can imagine why this beer holds a special place in Kimmich’s heart. . Well, now it holds a special place in my heart, too. I picked up this can all the way back in June, when I visited for @itsmeitsbmd1085’s bachelor party. This was my last can leftover from that trip. As bittersweet as that is, this beer definitely had no bitterness to it at all. Just luscious, sweet deliciousness. It’s a British-style imperial stout with a good kick and some great flavor to boot. One interesting note about this version that separates it from the ones brewed before 2017 is that Alchemist now works on a five-week-brewing cycle. Previous versions of the Luscious was often aged for 8, or even 12, weeks. The ones you’re getting at their Stowe location these days are much younger. You can have them fresh, or age them a while. Mine spent almost seven months in the fridge, and it was still incredible! . ABV: 9.2%, IBU: N/A, Rotating availability . @untappd says: 4.27/5

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